Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Tuesdays with Twitter

There are some really funny professors on Twitter.  I'm more interested in what students say.  It's like a car wreck in 140 characters or less.  I can't help but read.  Sometimes I respond.  Does this count as office hours?


 







It's like a smackdown where they write half the text.

Occasionally, they respond.  One kid told me to shut up and called me out as #mr27followers, which I thought was kind of funny.  Another student favorited my reply to her.  Most don't respond, which is probably for the best.

For those of you not on Twitter, you can follow along by reading the Twitter feed that is on the right side of the page.  I update it in the evening and sometimes during the day.

24 comments:

  1. At the institution where I used to teach, there was an unwritten rule that class averages had to be at least 60%. Woe betide any instructor when the average is less, so some resorted to "creative" marking.

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  2. I don't have Twitter, but I get a kick out of reading these. Kids with no clue blaming everyone but themselves. Maybe if they weren't sleeping or texting or Facebooking in class the scores would go up. But they won't ever admit to not bothering in the first place.

    I love the complainers regarding ANY assignment due before Spring Break, along with the ones bitching about stuff due after SB in the sidebar. Just go home and stay there until you grow up, kidlets. Maybe get a job dealing with the public for a year.

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    1. I remember, as an undergrad, having to contend with assignments or exams both before and after Reading Week. I can't say I was pleased about it but I realized that those were things that had to be done if I wanted to get my degree. Rather than whining about it, I rolled up my sleeves and got to work.

      Then again, people had a can-do attitude in those days.

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  3. Awesome smack downs. I hope that one or two of them actually think about Ben's responses b/c it does completely alter the reality of the situation. Then again, critical thinking doesn't seem to be something they hold as a strength.

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    1. One person tweeted back that I should shut up but we having attracted any annoying students here yet. I'm ambivalent about whether that's good.

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  5. I am thoroughly amused by these, but I do admit that I think you're at least slightly crazy for going to the length of responding to them. Then again, I guess that slightly crazy is sorta the status quo around here.

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  6. I really like the twitter feed on the side of the page! Thanks for updating it and sharing the fun with us non-twit-ers. =)

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  7. I also thought that #mr27followers was very funny. To them, that was an ultimate insult! The more followers you have, the cooler you are.

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    1. Little do they know how many followers Ben has here, in this bastion of old-fogey long-form writing.

      And if their contempt keeps them from coming over here and bothering us, probably all the better.

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    2. Ok, ok, what is #mr27followers?

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    3. When Ben responded to their tweet, they looked up his account and noticed that he only has 27 people following him or receiving his tweets to their devices. They didn't realize he posts his tweets on this blog as well.

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    4. Thank you, Cindy! Now I get it. Yep, that's pretty funny now!

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    5. CE, took me a while also - shows us where we are on the tech spectrum. On the other hand ,we have jobs.

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  8. As I contemplate returning my students' midterms tomorrow (the first tests I've given in some time; it's usually just papers, but this class is a bit different, and tests made sense), those tweets express my fears of what my students will be thinking (because, with the exception of about 10% of the class, they really bombed). I'm going to curve a bit, and tell them I did, but I don't think I'm going to explain too much otherwise.

    This strikes me as one of the unintended consequences of LMSs: class statistics are much easier to generate, and make available. I suspect it's been common practice to do so in the sciences for some time, but, at least at my university, students seem more willing to take responsibility for their 40% in chemistry or engineering than a similarly low grade in English.

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    1. Did you know that you can shut off that feature that gives class average? I always do it. The less they know, the better.

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    2. I think it's off by default in our LMS (but I'd better double-check).

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    3. Well, duh! They KNOW English. They've been speaking it all they're lives!

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  9. Hey Ben, quick note (and I hope I'm not telling you something you already know): If you put a period before the offending tweeter's handle when you reply, then your bons mots will appear in your followers' feeds. Without the dot, we have to hunt for it on your home page. I, for one, would love to see more of you when I have a few minutes to catch up with the Twitterverse.

    And, once again, for those of you hesitant to throw your hat into the Twitter ring--just do it! Academic Twitter is a glory to behold. You don't even have to tweet pictures of your lunch (unless you really really want to) to join the club. Promise!

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    Replies
    1. Let's pretend that I did know about getting my reply in the twitter feed and you just reminded me.

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  10. I have been known to play Vanna White at the front of the class, gesturing two-armedly as I pronounce and prance: "here's the reading; here's the date of lecture, and DOH!, there's the question from the test!" Then I scamper back to the left, and designate the next set, then the next until I think they have recognized the pattern...then I gives 'em back their poop piles.Curves this, bitches!, is my internal refrain.

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  11. I love the students throwing around the class averages like they know what it means. I grade in a straight percentage; this is explained on the syllabus with a cute little chart explaining which numbers one up with which letters. And after I hand back tests, there is always one or two flakes who will ask "I got 72 out of 100. What does that mean?"

    It means I've clearly been over-generous in assessing your ability to meet SLOs.

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  12. Loving the Twitter feed! I didn't notice it until my Firefox browser updated and rendered useless my AdBlock add-on.

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  13. Twitter reminds me of what citizen's band radio was like a generation or two ago.

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