Wednesday, February 19, 2014

A taste of Twitter

Oh, yeah.  Tweet for me baby.
How could I resist?  Although I have no shortage of stories about annoying students, it's easier just to show you the evidence.  More efficient that way, cuts out the middle man.  I think that's the whole point of Twitter, right?  Let idiots reveal themselves directly. 

Finding annoying students on Twitter is like finding breakfast at Waffle House - not very challenging.  The worst part about it is that even when they are at their most obnoxious, most student tweets are just boring.  "I don't like my class."  "My professor is mean."  A few take it to the next level, and that's what we're looking for here.

Having scanned the Twitterverse for a while, I've found a small selection of student complaints which reveal more about the students' character than their professor.

I roll my eyes at most of them but #2 breaks my heart a little.

8 comments:

  1. I love reading these. It also makes me glad I don't have Twitter.

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  2. Thank you for reminding me why I don't give students review sheets, exam guides, lists of vocab or formulae or "important dates" or anything like it. This proffie would have been better off telling the students "I expect you to make up your own review sheet; you will learn much more from doing that than you would from anything I could give you." This has the merit of being perfectly true, removing the burden from the prof's shoulders, and protecting the prof from beingt punished for having gone the extra mile - making up and giving the little twerps a review sheet - but apparently not having not been helpful "enough", or not at the right time, or not in precisely the format these entitled twits wanted.

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    Replies
    1. I never gave out review or formula sheets. Whenever I was asked for one prior to an exam, I told them to make their own. That way, they'd be forced to figure out what information and equations they needed and, if they get something wrong, it was their fault.

      If I gave them a sheet, they would have demanded I write their exams for them, or give them exams with the solutions already included.

      Delete
    2. That's clearly one moral of these tweets: don't promise them a review sheet in the first place (and give them a good -- and, yes, entirely valid -- explanation of why they should construct their own review sheets.

      Definitely don't promise them a review sheet, then distribute it less than 24 hours before the test. That's wrong on all kinds of levels, not to mention student-evaluation suicide.

      Which brings us back to where we began: just say no to teacher-created review sheets.

      Delete
  3. I also had to learn about the perils of going the extra mile the hard way, when students complained to no end that my practice exams were "completely different" than the actual exams. I literally used to take the time to create (often from scratch) twice as many exam questions as were needed, so that I could give students example practice exams to aid in their studying. Apparently the students were thinking that "practice exam" meant "an exact duplicate of your exam, ahead of time".

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    Replies
    1. I put copies of my old exams on reserve. I let the students know about it but, quite often, people wouldn't take advantage of it. There were some who complained that I didn't include the solutions, but I told them that I might use questions from those old exams when making up my mid-terms or finals, which I usually did.

      I remember course in which students wailed and complained that the final exam was "too hard". I pointed out to them after the frivolities were over that many of the questions were from those old exams on reserve and that some of those same questions had been used for quizzes that I gave during the course.

      Did they admit they were at fault for not doing their work? Of course not. Then again, it was the only group out of all those I taught in that course that got an average on the final exam of less than 50%

      Delete
  4. I'm giving tests for the first time in some time this semester (mostly I just assign papers, but it's a bigger class, and not writing-intensive). The questions about what is on the test are beginning already, and "questions about the reading" doesn't seem to be cutting it as an answer.

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    Replies
    1. I have, in the past, basically read the TOC to them and they appreciated me so much more for having done so... well, the ones who didn't realize I was simply reading the TOC to them did.

      Delete